Fact or Fiction? Common Myths in the Beauty World

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MYTH #1: The FDA ensures that all cosmetics statements are factual before you buy them.

A: FALSE! The FDA or Food & Drug Administration does not require approval of cosmetics before their manufacture and sale since the products are neither labeled for dietary consumption or as a medial supplement. The FDA onlySkinStore.com regulated the claims made and the labeling provided on each product. Cosmetics can ONLY claim to change the appearance of the body or skin, not the function.

MYTH #2: Sunscreen can actually increase the risk of skin cancer.

A: FALSE! Octinoxate is a chemical sunscreen that is preferred by sensitive skin types. Most physical sunscreens contain zinc oxide which can cause irritation. NO sunscreen can block 100% of the sun’s rays (UVB, UVA or otherwise). You will notice a large change in the way sunscreens are marketed in the United States. The Sun Protection Factor, or SPF, labels the strength of the sunscreen but does no matter how the strong sunscreen, they lose their potency after about two hours and need to be reapplied.

MYTH #3: Exfoliating scrubs can be used as an explosive.

A: FALSE! Most exfoliants or “scrubs” contain a variety of grainy materials ranging from fruit pits to seeds to diatomaceous earth, which help slough of dead skin cells from the surface. Diatomaceous earth (DE), marine sediment or fossil algae, is used in many other products not limited to the skincare industry. DE can also be combined with nitroglycerin to classify as dynamite, which is never found in skin care products.

MYTH #4: Your waterproof mascara coats your lashes in plastic.

A: TRUE! Plastic derivatives have been used in a variation of products for many years. Plastic derivatives or polymers are crucial in the production of hairspray, hair gel, liquid bandages and even perfumes. Polymers, when viewed under a microscope, are perfectly round spheres and do not damage the surface of the skin or irritate sensitive areas like the eyes, ears, or nose.

MYTH #5: Lipsticks contains a lethal amount of lead.

A: FALSE! In 2009, the FDA developed a method of testing to determine the amount of lead in products. It was then the FDA confirmed that the amount of lead found in lipstick was detected in 20 lipstick products but very low and did not pose any safety or health concerns. The lead levels are attributed to color additives and other ingredients that are acceptable by the FDA.




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